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BLOG POST: We are also a Manufacturer
Are your products OEM or Compatible?

Shop In Today offers a mixture of OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) and Compatible products. Our OEM products are designated with “Genuine” or "OEM" in the product titles as well as the Sku (Reorder) number ending in "-OEM". All other products are Compatible. Our Compatible products are manufactured to exacting specifications that meet or exceed OEM standards. You can have complete confidence in our compatible products as they have been sold for many years worldwide. Each product is backed by our "No Quibble Guarantee”. Any questions or concerns, please contact our Sales Department using the “Contact Us” form.


Why should I buy Compatible Products?

Think of the last time you picked up a prescription at the drug store. Many times you receive generic (compatible) medication rather than the brand name. This saves you a considerable amount of money.

You can also save a considerable amount of money over OEM products. Don’t be tricked into thinking that a lower price means a lower quality product. Compatible products are manufactured to exacting specifications that meet or exceed OEM standards.


Will Compatible Products Void my Warranty or Service Contract?

NO! We occasionally run into situations where our customer feels that they are forced to use OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) supplies. We, of course, do not know the specifics of the service contract that your company has with your service provider, however, we can make you aware of some important restrictions as to just how much a service provider can limit your freedom of choice with regard to supplies and consumables.


While we are not qualified to offer legal advice, it may be of interest for you to know that there two bodies of legislation that prohibit denying consumers freedom of choice with regard to from whom they can buy their supplies and consumables: The Sherman & Clayton Antitrust Acts and the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act.

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SHERMAN & CLAYTON ANTITRUST ACTS
http://www.ftc.gov/bc/antitrust/antitrust_laws.shtm

The Sherman Antitrust Act was passed by the US Congress in 1890. “The Sherman Act outlaws "every contract, combination, or conspiracy in restraint of trade," and any "monopolization, attempted monopolization, or conspiracy or combination to monopolize."”

The Clayton Antitrust Act was passed by the US Congress in 1914. “Section 7 of the Clayton Act prohibits mergers and acquisitions where the effect "may be substantially to lessen competition, or to tend to create a monopoly." As amended by the Robinson-Patman Act of 1936, the Clayton Act also bans certain discriminatory prices, services, and allowances in dealings between merchants”.

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At one time it was common practice for IBM to intimidate customers by threatening to terminate, and in some cases terminating, equipment leases if the customer did not use all original supplies manufactured by IBM. The US Supreme court determined that this was a 'tying agreement' and found the practice to be in direct violation of the Sherman & Clayton Antitrust Act. This was a landmark decision ... and a very expensive and embarrassing experience for IBM.



The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act, as the name implies, relates to similar situations when the equipment involved is under warranty.
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MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY IMPROVEMENT ACT
http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/15/usc_sec_15_00002302----000-.html

Chapter 50 – Consumer Product Warranties
“2302. Rules governing contents and warranties”

“No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumer's using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade or corporate name; except that the prohibition of this subsection be waived by the commission if:

1. The warrantor satisfies the Commission that the warranted product will function properly only if the article or service so identified is used in connection with the warranted product, and

2. The Commission finds that such a waiver is in the public interest.”


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